How to Make FastPass+ Reservations for Walt Disney World Resort

Walt Disney World Travel Planning for First-Timers (or Those Who Haven’t Been in a Few Years) – Part 3: FastPass+

No one wants to spend all their vacation standing in line waiting to get on an attraction. With advance planning using the FastPass+ system, you don’t have to at Walt Disney World. FastPass+ allows you to reserve a one-hour window to go to an attraction and enter via the shorter FastPass+ line instead of the regular, standby line. This can cut the wait time down to 15 minutes or less, and it’s free. Many first-timers make the mistake of assuming it’s an extra cost. It is not so be sure to take advantage of it. Continue reading

What Are Your Rights and Limitations if Your Hotel is Overbooked?

Do You Know Your Rights and Limitations When It Comes to Overbooking Travel Issues? Part 2 – Hotels

You’ve made it to your destination, you’re tired, it’s late, and you can’t wait to get settled into your hotel room. You get to the front desk only to be told there are no rooms available. How can that be? You have a reservation.  You could also run into a scenario that happened to me a couple of years ago. Two weeks before I was leaving on a business trip, I received an email from the hotel stating that they cancelled my reservation. No reason was given. It was just cancelled and I had to scramble to book a room somewhere else and ended up in a hotel quite a distance from my meetings. Continue reading

Disney Cruise Line Tips for 1st Time Cruisers

Disney Cruise Line Tips for First-Time Cruisers – Part 1, Preparing for Your Cruise

In just three short weeks, I will be leaving on my 8th Disney Cruise Line voyage and my 11th cruise overall. This one, though, will be quite different as I am traveling not only with my own family, but with four other families, none of whom have ever cruised or even set foot on a Disney Cruise Line ship. I’m actually looking forward to it. There’s just something about the wonder of traveling with someone for whom everything will be new. I’m so excited for them. I have realized, however, that there can also be a lot of questions and one can end up with too much information when researching, so I put a list of tips together for those with whom I’m traveling and am sharing them here with you. Continue reading

Walt Disney World Travel Planning for First-Timers (or Those Who Haven’t Been in a Few Years) – Part 2: Making Dining Reservations

Reservations for those restaurants that take them, dinner shows, or dining packages can be made 180 days in advance. If you are staying at a Disney World Resort, then you can make them 180 days from your check in date through your check out date as long as it’s within 10 days, so slightly longer than 6 months. Certain restaurants book up really, really early such as Be Our Guest and Cinderella’s Royal Table in Magic Kingdom and Le Cellier in Epcot. Many character meals (restaurants that have Disney characters visit your table while you’re dining) may also sell out early as well. In addition, during peak periods such as Thanksgiving and Christmas, ALL restaurants that take reservations are likely to require reservations well in advance. For those that don’t make reservations, there are still fast food type options available in all the parks and at the resorts that don’t require nor take reservations. Continue reading

Passenger Rights - What Are They for Air Travel?

Do You Know Your Rights and Limitations When It Comes to Overbooking Travel Issues? Part 1 – Air Travel

By now, I’m sure everyone has at least heard about the unfortunate incident on a United flight last week where a man was forcibly removed from a plane. I’m not going to get into what was wrong with that particular scenario, but being a frequent traveler and travel blogger, I read people’s comments on social media and quickly realized that the casual traveler knows very little about overbooking and denial of service. In addition, it’s not always easy to find information about a travel company’s policies to find out one’s rights if that happens so I hope the overview below will help.

Know Your Air Travel RightsFirst, know that overbooking doesn’t just happen with the airlines. Hotels do it. Rental car companies do it, too. Companies in the travel industry have learned over the years that they can count on a certain percentage of no shows and cancellations. Then, they sell more seats or rooms or cars than they have available, gambling that there will be enough cancellations or no shows to cover it. Sometimes that happens; other times it can turn into a nightmare for a traveler who has very little recourse.

Since this is such a huge topic, today I’m just going to cover airlines. Next week, I will cover hotels and then the following week I will cover rental car companies so be sure to check back for more information. Continue reading